Euphoria Tech-Psychology Meetup

Euphoria Tech-Psychology Meetup
March 1, 2017 Euphoria

Nowadays Virtual Reality is one of the most talked about technology across the globe. Everyone is finding new ways to solve problems by bringing VR technology into the equation. Even though virtual reality itself is still a hard idea to grasp for most people who have not experienced it yet. The use of VR has been generating a lot of buzz around the world. Following this trend, Euphoria organized a Tech-Psychology meet up in Arfa Software Technology Park Lahore. The agenda of meet up was to find out what possibilities VR can create in the field of psychology.

Euphoria prepared some demos and showed them to the professional psychologist from all over Lahore and gathered their response regarding VR therapy. Whole new ways were discovered in which VR therapy can be used to treat patients.

At this time, VR is widely used for exposure therapy, gradually exposing people to the situation that triggers their anxiety or PTSD. Exposure is among the finest treatments we certainly have for both PTSD and certain anxiety disorders. Along with this, clinicians frequently use cognitive behavioral to teach patients tips dealing with those unusual situations. Applying VR and perhaps various other additional techs, a specialist can recreate a picture that triggers fear or anxiety in a patient, putting them almost on a plane or caught up in a job room packed with people or even in a battlefield environment. With guidance, people can grow accustomed to the scenario until they get to the point that they can cope with the scene. Researchers have treated people with arachnophobia by exposing them to virtual spiders and even more efficiently, having them touch fake spiders during that process. Studies have shown that VR exposure therapy can help people with other conditions, including fear of flying, social anxiety, and — perhaps most well documented so far — PTSD.

With guidance, people can expand accustomed to the circumstance until they get to the point they can manage handle with the scene. Analysts have treated people with arachnophobia by exposing them to virtual spiders and even more efficiently, getting fake touch spiders in that process. Studies have shown that VR publicity can help people with other conditions, including fear of flying, sociable anxiety, and — perhaps most well documented so far — PTSD. It may sound impossible to imagine that a virtual environment could seem so real that someone learns something that applies to the real world. But even when the graphics aren’t as realistic as one might hope, VR really can convey a sense of reality and presence that’s almost impossible to understand without experiencing it. Applications of VR in psychology are limitless; we only have to find the right way and have to hit the market at the right time.